Guide for reporting about People with Disabilities

2016-09-12

Writers, editors, reporters and other communicators strive to use the most accurate terminology about people with disabilities. However, inaccurate, archaic and offensive expressions are still commonly used, perpetuating negative stereotypes and beliefs about people with disabilities. In order to assist them, GADIM released a reporting guide, created by the Research and Training Center on Independent Living of the University of Kansas, USA, and reviewed by numerous organizations of persons with Disabilities.

For example, a person who uses a wheelchair – an objective fact – is often described as wheelchair-bound, a subjective description that implies victim hood. As one wheelchair user puts it, “I personally am not ‘bound’ by my wheelchair. It is a very liberating device that allows me to work, play, maintain a household, connect with family and friends, and ‘have a life.’ ”
See more.
 

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  • Copyright 2016